Game. Bus. Match

The rules of the game

don’t engage

when everyone’s insane

or

all too sane and

out for what they can get

innit

every journey takes an hour

no standing in the upper deck

(gosh I feel tall up there tho)

the things you learn

like

never get off transport that’s still moving towards home

no matter what they say

but if it’s stopped

bail straight off

wait, walk or find another way

and always complain

to someone – even just in your own brain

A bomb threat’s not a bomb threat. Is not a bomb threat, is Not a bomb threat

until it is. And terrorism

And then there’s The Met

-bless-

On the Tube

stand

stare at your hands, stare at your hands, rake your eyes over the stands

do not make contact

move down please

move aside

got a seat

eye the crotches, no. Look around, read the ads, don’t wanna be sold to. Eye the crotches, no. read the free newspaper. Eye the crotches, no

do not make contact with eyes or crotches

whatever you do

no

Mind the gap, wait a lot, shove your shoulder, look away, never delay for the next one, although sometimes it’s a sure thing, hey?

The rules are. There are no rulez. No one learns these things in schools, mate

What a teacher.

Preach.

London.

A law of…  masses. Critical. Random.

Can’t. Believe. People. Do. It. Every. Day.

It seems normal. Actually… it seems very fucking normal

The whole world, jerked around, on a big red bus

what a sound

insane decibels juddering and yet all’s well, we’re moving

kid’s screaming, shuttup, we’re all getting home, no one cares, where I get off

let me off

Back door please!

 

Today’s GloPoWriMo prompt was to write a poem that incorporates the vocabulary and imagery of a specific sport or game. London transport is a sport all of its own.

Urgent

Photo: https://unsplash.com/@laura_geror

It’s urgent for me

Is it urgent for you?

Yes, good

Let’s go

Hold my hand

I won’t let you fall

step lightly on gossamer threads of dreams / our heaviness bags down the quicksilver / distractions greying out clarity / into fat bottoms of despair and swooping rebounds / hope, brilliance, the creative urge / urgency / only to snap!

That is all

 

I’m running a day late with my GloPoWriMo now… argh! Day 19’s prompt was to write a poem that recounts a creation myth. This is a slanted take on it based on a dream I had this morning (lame!) where a woman in a creative meeting asked me if my writing work was urgent, to which I replied, yes. She nodded in agreement: for me too. Go! Go! Go! 

Unneighbours

Photo: https://unsplash.com/@jamie452

Here we are unneighbours
ignorrelated peoples of
a vast and ambivicity
falsenatural scents crushed under
bootstep and paveground down
an insalubri-sewer lurking at
ankleheight and laughing
with its darklode of
chattertat, the importathoughts  nolongerseemed
unlistened to, unscreamed, suffocatbreathed
we ceasedream and retreat

 

Todays prompt: to write a poem that incorporates neologisms. What’s that? Well, it’s a made-up word! Your neologisms could be portmanteaus (basically, a word made from combining two existing words, like “motel” coming from “motor” and “hotel”) or they could be words invented entirely for their sound. Probably the most famous example of a poem incorporating neologisms is Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky, but neologisms don’t have to be funny or used in the service of humor. You can use them to try to get at something that you don’t have an exact word for, or to create a sense of sound and rhythm, or simply to make the poem feel strange and unworldly.

I did this nonsense-word poem and the compound-word poem above. 

What the Jabberwock?

Jithering to sleep

guts on the rouil

thoughts derting and stibben

reach to encrescalate

please don’t dretch

not ready to soussime

faisht now. All faisht.

Todays prompt: to write a poem that incorporates neologisms. What’s that? Well, it’s a made-up word! Your neologisms could be portmanteaus (basically, a word made from combining two existing words, like “motel” coming from “motor” and “hotel”) or they could be words invented entirely for their sound. Probably the most famous example of a poem incorporating neologisms is Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky, but neologisms don’t have to be funny or used in the service of humor. You can use them to try to get at something that you don’t have an exact word for, or to create a sense of sound and rhythm, or simply to make the poem feel strange and unworldly. 

I wanted to German the shit out of this with clever compound words but I ran out of time and motivation. Oh well.  OK so I did another one


Metal hearts

as the night draws in
I think about
one of the few people
I can cry with
or rage
while
the dark music of
your northern home
I never went to
plays
and
in dark-blue eyes
you watched
once
as I wasted away
staring
at my
own
reflection
but you told me
today
to invert the picture
and see my own strength
something to think about
as the night draws in

 

 

Today’s GloPoWriMo prompt was to write a nocturne. In music, a nocturne is a composition meant to be played at night, usually for piano, and with a tender and melancholy sort of sound. Your nocturne should aim to translate this sensibility into poetic form!

In the middle of love

 

in the middle of love

in the middle of life

in the middle of London

what am I to do?

I could do a fuck-lot worse

than being

stuck

in

the middle

with you

 

We are in London for a dear friend’s wedding … Prompt:  Because we’re halfway through NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that reflects on the nature of being in the middle of something. The poem could be about being on a journey and stopping for a break, or the gap between something half-done and all-done. 

 

Vader

Darth Vader is scary of course

But can he fight a lion with The Force?

Maybe he’d do the lion a favour

And help make dinner with his light sabre

 

I was honoured to be the featured participant on NaPoWriMo today for my London Ghazal. 🙂 

Today’s prompt: Because it’s Friday, let’s keep it light and silly today, with a clerihew. This is a four line poem biographical poem that satirizes a famous person. 

My 5yo son helped me write this one, he’s really getting into rhymes lately!  

Photo: http://www.slashfilm.com

Ghazal

 

Oh the mixed-up emotions of being back in London

Knowing you never ever can win London

 

At first it seems like a dream of English perfection

But then, you’ve always been good at spin, London

 

Your welcoming arms mask impervious charms

And they say everyone living here’s kin, London

 

How many folks when they dream of a place

Immediately go off and pin London?

 

Grimy streets and houses, all the same old shops

And you really could use some more bins London

 

But then there’s that energy, heady and strong

Delicious dens of vice, carousing and sin London

 

I may have moved on, but your pull is still strong

Feel you under my skin to chagrin, London

 

And yet I D-Claire, again I am here

Dirty-pretty auld town you’re a djinn, London

 

Today’s prompt was to write a ghazal. The form was originally developed in Arabic and Persian poetry, but has become increasingly used in English, after being popularized by poets including Agha Shahid Ali. A ghazal is formed of couplets, each of which is its own complete statement. Both lines of the first couplet end with the same phrae or end-word, and that end-word is also repeated at the end of each couplet. If you’re really feeling inspired, you can also attempt to incorporate internal rhymes and a reference to your own name in the final couplet. 

This is my first-ever ghazal 🙂 

 

 

 

Coffee?

coffee converging in conversation

pulls page-long pathways across procrastination

files of fiery photons like flying foxes

inklings, darlings! ideas, sparking

alighting at an allied assignation

thinking, darling, of

a car ride with cousins cocooned in comfort

very like visions, varied yet uniform

of factory windows fitted with fliers from

inside, darling…

oh, how my heart soars, unfolds with

sudden secret solace in solidarity with those who sleep–

their heads held high in the wind while

their bodies bode safe below–

darling. sweet.

 

Today’s GloPoWriMo prompt was to write a poem that explicitly incorporates alliteration (the use of repeated consonant sounds) and assonance (the use of repeated vowel sounds). This ended up being a bit of a style over substance but, although it sounds like a bit of a nonsense poem, there are real ideas in there, I swear. Mystery!